Wednesday, November 11, 2009

google datacenter

Google’s data centers are the object of great fascination, and the intrigue about these facilities is only deepened by Google’s secrecy about its operations. We’ve written a lot about Google’s facilities, and thought it would be useful to summarize key information in a series of Frequently Asked Questions: The Google Data Center FAQ.

Why is Google so secretive about its data centers?
Google believes its data center operations give it a competitive advantage, and says as little as possible about these facilities. The company believes that details such as the size and power usage of its data centers could be valuable to competitors. To help maintain secrecy, Google typically seeks permits for its data center projects using Limited Liability Corporations (LLCs) that don’t mention Google, such as Lapis LLC (North Carolina) or Tetra LLC (Iowa).

How many data centers does Google have?
Nobody knows for sure, and the company isn’t saying. The conventional wisdom is that Google has dozens of data centers. We’re aware of at least 12 significant Google data center installations in the United States, with another three under construction. In Europe, Google is known to have equipment in at least five locations, with new data centers being built in two other venues.

Where are Google’s data centers located?
Google has disclosed the sites of four new facilities announced in 2007, but many of its older data center locations remain under wraps. Much of Google’s data center equipment is housed in the company’s own facilities, but it also continues to lease space in a number of third-party facilities. Much of its third-party data center space is focused around peering centers in major connectivity hubs. Here’s our best information about where Google is operating data centers, building new ones, or maintaining equipment for network peering. Facilities we believe to be major data centers are bold-faced.

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